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  1. #1

    Fixed gear bike?

    My quite a number of years but not a decade old Dawes Mojave needs quite a few repairs, and I'm not sure it's economic. I haven't used it for about a year because I haven't gotten around to try and do anything about fixing it. It needs new gears, Derailleur, chain, mudguards, carrier fixed. The front and rear gear cogs look quite worn. the wheels, frame, and seat are OK I think. But it's going to cost a lot to get it all fixed.

    I tend to be bad at keeping bikes well maintained, and I've had a lot of trouble with the gears over the years.

    I'm tempted to simply buy a new bike, and get a single gear bike. I like the idea of one with two sprokets on the rear wheel, one fixed and one freewheeling. I can't afford much, so would be looking at the Viking or Raleigh el cheapo bikes. I'd want to put some sort of mudgards on it, but like the idea of clip on plastic mudguards because they'll be simple.

    I live in Leicester which is a fairly flat place, and I'd use the bike for cycling around the city.

    It's often said that you can get better value for money buying second hand. But TBH I can't be *rs*d and just want something I can use with no mess no fuss.

    Any comments/advice.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    Try a bike shop, they sell bikes

  3. #3
    Senior Member Mike the bike's Avatar
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    Inexplicably, fixies are still popular and there are loads on the market. If price is really the dominant factor try Edinburgh Cycles who sell their own brand at good prices and whose after-sales service is great.

  4. #4
    Senior Member chris bagust's Avatar
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    Put a fixed wheel on the Dawes?

  5. #5
    One of my posts was sent for moderation and hasn't appeared, so there's missing context.

    Putting a fixed wheel on the Dawes was something I considered. But then I would have to research what wheel fits and then what size chain and can I keep the front deraillier, and given the front cogs what rear cog size do I want and ...... The reason I want a fixie is because I can't be *rs*d doing this and that, I just want to ride a $&%*(% bike. So I just went ahead and bought a cheap fixie.

    My master plan is to simply ride the damn thing, even if it's cheap. The Dawes was cheap at the time I bought it and there was nothing really wrong with it other than I didn't look after it properly. I even rode the original tyres to destruction, then replaced them with kevlar lined ones so that I wouldn't have to faff about fixing punctures so often.

    As cheap bits wear out on the fixie, I'll replace them with slightly better bits. But primarily I haven't been a cyclist for over a year, and now I will be again. That's the bottom line, all the rest is window dressing given where I am now.

    The reviews on Viking bikes I read suggest that while they are obviously cheap with cheap components, they're not quite as bad as, ... I'm told the term is 'bike shaped objects'.

    A local shop says that they can fix the Dawes for about 100. I'm considering having that done, so that I have two bikes. The Dawes would have gears and a carrier/panniers and mudguards, the fixie won't. So I could choose what I wanted at any time. And then if one of them broke down I'd still have the other to ride while I'm as always taking *%*% ages to get around to doing anything about it.
    Last edited by Annoying Twit; 23rd January 2013 at 10:25 AM.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
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    ias you say your area is realtively flat, so if you can get a single speed / fixie cheap then go for it. Always worth having another machine around in case one breaks down.

    For riding in traffic I prefer single speed to fixed, but that's just me. Mine has been a great commuting machine and maintenance is quicker than my geared machines.

    Chris

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by CVP View Post
    ias you say your area is realtively flat, so if you can get a single speed / fixie cheap then go for it. Always worth having another machine around in case one breaks down.

    For riding in traffic I prefer single speed to fixed, but that's just me. Mine has been a great commuting machine and maintenance is quicker than my geared machines.

    Chris
    As my Dawes slowly bit the dust and I continued to not get around to getting it fixed, I did spend some time stuck on the bottom sprocket of the rear gear while still being able to change the ratio at the front. I do remember being happy one day when my bike unilaterally decided to change from the 5th highest rear gear to the 6th and absolute highest, meaning that I could go faster.

    By 'single speed' do you mean the freewheel side of the flip-flop hub? My brother has advised me to use the freewheel side first, until I get used to it, then try the fully fixed side.

    Quite a lot of the routes that I will ride on have noticeably pancake-like properties. However, I actually live right on a hill, meaning that the last 50 metres to get home will be an opportunity for some leg strength training.

  8. #8
    I did buy a cheap bike and know what to expect. But even then I'm disappointed with the quality of the pedals. I can't imagine the stock ones are going to last very long at all. Oh well, at least there's a well known solution for that when the pedals do fail.

  9. #9
    Senior Member
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    I meant the freewheel side of the flip flop hub. For commuting where you might have to make last minute swerve / braking to avoid cars/ pedestrians/ pets / mothers with buggies etc etc then I prefer the flexibility to stop pedaling and so definitely avoid pedal strike. That's just me, lots of folks enjoy riding fully fixed whilst commuting through traffic so either way is nto an issue.

    I do enjoy the simplicity of one gear - hills = push harder, more speed = push harder, there's no bail out option

  10. #10
    Yes, I'm intending to use the freewheel. When I was cycling before, one of the major hazards was small dogs which seem to always wait until I reach them, and then walk right in front of my front wheel.

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