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  1. #1

    Building your own bike shed

    My friend asked me to build a big bike shed for him. He runs a leisure centre in the UK and wants something like this.



    I have started building the actual bike rack and it has come out really good. My concern is the actual shed part. He wants a roofed shed with a reasonable height like the above photo. I have gotten permission from the council and they allowed it as long as there are no lights at the top.

    I have started building the base of the shed from wood that I purchased from b&q. I'm now looking for a platform in order to construct the top part and also to paint. A standard ladder doesn't seem to balance well on the legs. I have been told about telescopic ladders from B&Q and it seems to be a good option. It looks promising with good features. Does anyone else own a telescopic ladder and would you recommend it over a standard ladder for this purpose?

    Also an I allowed to make the shed as high as I want or do I need to declare it to the council first? They were very brief about the whole situation and only mentioned that I can use dark colours to paint it but nothing regarding the height.

    Thanks
    Last edited by polentasums; 2nd February 2016 at 10:08 PM.

  2. #2
    Senior Member VLAD (the Friendly Vamp)'s Avatar
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    Why not build it upside down - then you don't need a ladder at all.

    Just get all the people who want to park their bike - to flip it over.
    "Life is too short to have anything but delusional notions about yourself."
    Gene Simmons - Kiss

    God - why am I so great !!!


  3. #3
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    Your local council will have an online planning portal which gives heights and distances in different scenarios. If in doubt, give them a call.

  4. #4
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    Are you an experienced carpenter or a builder maybe ? Building a Bike enclosure in a public place is a serious business. It needs foundation work, structural integrity to deal with all weathers and winds. It's just, when you ask about platforms to get you to a certain height, it sounds as if you have never undertaken such work before an that makes me nervous.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cliffyboy1962 View Post
    Are you an experienced carpenter or a builder maybe ? Building a Bike enclosure in a public place is a serious business. It needs foundation work, structural integrity to deal with all weathers and winds. It's just, when you ask about platforms to get you to a certain height, it sounds as if you have never undertaken such work before an that makes me nervous.
    Quite so - this lad is either na´ve about such building processes (including the necessary bureaucratic council stuff) or perhaps trying to get us to click on his ladder link....

    Assuming the enterprise is genuine, there'd be a need to make some proper plans (including all that foundation stuff), get planning permission then build the thing with a scaffold rather than a ladder. Looking at the example proposed as a model, I suspect a large number of ten-pound notes will also be needed, as well as much expertise from craftsmen fellows.

    Amateurs can make these things but it's typically a long drawn-out learning process inclusive of many errors and the associated costs.

    Lataxe

  6. #6
    Senior Member Gasper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lataxe View Post
    or perhaps trying to get us to click on his ladder link....
    Ah, good spot, must admit I didn't pick that up, and my Spam-o-meter is usually pretty sensitive.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Gasper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cliffyboy1962 View Post
    Are you an experienced carpenter or a builder maybe ? Building a Bike enclosure in a public place is a serious business. It needs foundation work, structural integrity to deal with all weathers and winds. It's just, when you ask about platforms to get you to a certain height, it sounds as if you have never undertaken such work before an that makes me nervous.
    Cliff, I'm guessing the shed in the OPs photo has a steel frame ? There were 150 mph winds last night in the Cairngorms, so I doubt a few posts and a bit of plywood from B&Q would last long.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gasper View Post
    Cliff, I'm guessing the shed in the OPs photo has a steel frame ? There were 150 mph winds last night in the Cairngorms, so I doubt a few posts and a bit of plywood from B&Q would last long.
    Yes, the B&Q wooden stuff is, in my experience, poor quality and very over-priced. Far better value & quality can be obtained from a proper timber yard.

    Wood frames can be very strong if built properly. As long as the foundations are secure and the joints/fastenings well made then wood can actually be a bit better than more rigid structures in a wind, as they will flex somewhat. A very rigid structure may fail more suddenly and catastrophically. (A bit like metal bike frames versus carbon bike frames).

    Mr 1962 is right about the foundations being critical. I have a friend who built a rather enormous playhouse-come-obstacle course in his large garden, for the snappers. It was over-engineered in timber sections of large cross-section and sturdy joint, however .... the lad failed to understand that the weight of the edifice would require something more than plonking it on the grassy sod and so halfway through the first build he had to de-construct it after it kilted over, as the supports on one side sank into a soft area of turf then started sliding down the shallow bank it was built on......

    Lataxe, who sticks to manageable furniture.

  9. #9
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    Seems to be a spam scam but we wait to be proven wrong. I am not a builder but I have spent most of my working life on building sites around the country and the basics of construction is always laid bare, to be observed and absorbed as I would rush around with laptop and tools, making HVAC control systems operate.

    Cliffyboy, loving the construction industry even though no longer part of it.

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