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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boxhilljunkie View Post
    I always thought carbon frames where made in one peice .
    looks good tho..
    No carbon frame is made in one piece. The ones that come closer to building a frame in one piece are called "monocoque". How it works is as follows: the frame is constructed in several pieces using molds and then they are glued together (see photo below). I use what it's called "tube to tube" process which is glueing together entire tubes at different joins after such tubes have been cut to an exact measure. Both methods have advantages and disadvantages. Monocoque construction is what most large bike companies use since they can create many frames quickly from a single mold but, on the other hand, customization is not achieved so you have to find a frame that you can fit into and not the other way around. Tube to tube construction can be fully customized to the user in terms of geometry, style of riding, etc. but this construction methodology is labour intensive resulting in more expensive frames.

    Argonaut monocoque.jpg

  2. #12
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    Hello everyone. I shall continue with my story by showing you how I make the dropouts. The first step is to create a sheet composed of several layers of carbon fiber. Once cured , this plate will be about 3 mm thick, enough to cut and extract out some very strong and super light dropouts. The photo shows how the different layers of prepreg carbon are placed on top of an aluminum plate which has been previously polished and cleaned with release agent,
    IMG_0054.jpg

  3. #13
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    Then, placed in a vacuum bag and in an oven for curing,
    plate1.jpg
    Last edited by Duende; 1st July 2016 at 8:17 AM.

  4. #14
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    This is what it looks like after curing (sorry for the poor quality of the photo),
    Attachment 1766
    Last edited by Duende; 26th June 2016 at 12:11 PM.

  5. #15
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    Next step is to place the recently made carbon fiber sheet into a CNC cutting machine to cut out the dropouts,
    IMG_0134.jpgIMG_0135.jpg
    Last edited by Duende; 26th June 2016 at 12:11 PM.

  6. #16
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    And this is the final result: a very strong and light pair of dropouts ready to be attached to chainstays which I will show how they are made in my next "installment",
    punteras.jpg
    Last edited by Duende; 26th June 2016 at 12:11 PM.

  7. #17
    Senior Member The return of Marty Wild's Avatar
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    Muy bien, keep it coming!

  8. #18
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    Hello everyone. Now I want to show you how the chain stays and rear brake bridge are made using molds. Molds can be made in different materials. In this particular case, they have been made of aluminum. A mold is no more than the shape of the part you want to make in a block of aluminum which has been cut and polished on a lathe. The shape of the chain stays can be designed in a CAD program as shown in the photo,
    chain stay design.jpg

  9. #19
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    Once the design has been finalized, the mold is built, as I said, on a lathe. The mold is composed of two halves that are to be used to encapsulate the part that is being built. Mold specifications have to be very accurate since the quality of the part depends on it. Subsequently, the mold is covered with carbon fiber, in this case, unidirectional. The photo shows the mold with a few layers of carbon fiber already in place,
    IMG_0127.jpg
    Last edited by Duende; 27th June 2016 at 10:06 AM.

  10. #20
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    The mold is then closed onto itself and placed in an oven for curing. This is how it looks after the mold is extracted from the oven,
    IMG_0117.jpg

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