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  1. #1

    I've picked my bike - any comments

    Firstly, hello, I'm new to this forum but it looks fab.

    I'm a new cyclist (less than 6 months) but I've caught the bug... but the first 6 months have been spent on a hardtail which I've loved.

    I've been toying with the idea of getting a road bike for some time now, to do some winter riding and also general training on.

    I took my hardtail into my local LBS for a service and started browsing, and fell in love (visually, I will admit) with the Whyte Dorset 2017 model. It is selling for 1,060 - the deal in the shop is the bike, and some new tyres (they were Schwalbe tyres, to replace the slicks, I forget the model, but they were knobbly), a set of clipless pedals and 3 services in the first year.

    Things I like about the bike other than looks are the more relaxed riding postion, the disc brakes, how light it was, and the feel of the ride. I had in my head a budget of 1,000 so this fits well. I also like the idea of using an LBS rather than the big shops, although maybe this time of year with Black Friday coming is the worst time for this. But the prospect of building up a relationship with the shop appeals too.

    Does anybody have any comments on this bike? I plan to use on roads and cycle paths, and build up my riding to do some great rides in the summer.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    Welcome - I'd get the slicks put back on..... Or some decent ones. Nobblies have no place on the road

  3. #3
    Senior Member
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    May 2014
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    Hello!

    Sounds like a great bike- I like the Whytes, our local shop stocks them, and chapeau for supporting your LBS! Pays dividends when you have a problem you need sorting quickly as they will always help you out. For bigger purchases, a local shop will usually price match vs online, or at least get close to it and offer a proper aftersales service.

    Might be worth investing in some mudguards to get the best out of it over the winter, plus some all-season road tyres rather than the nobbly ones.
    "Training is also a battle" - Kim Jong-Un

  4. #4
    Senior Member Gasper's Avatar
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    Well done for taking up Road cycling. I cannot comment on the bike personally, as long as it has two wheels a saddle and some brakes you'll be fine, don't worry too much about the make/model at this stage. Road tyres are essential I would say. The best advice is to get out and ride it, and get a few thousand miles under your belt. You will see what other people wear/ride and learn from experience. This is a challenging time of year to start. you probably need to think about getting some warm gear, mudguards and lights 1st.
    "Go forth and ride your bike". Courtesy of Me 2015.

  5. #5
    Thanks everyone.

    Maybe I was wrong about the tyres then - we talked about how I'd probably split my time between roads and the local cycle path and he suggested more grip in general, but maybe not knobblies - I'll check when I go in.

    I'm ok for warm gear at the minute thanks to my MTB time though a big jacket might come in handy now and some overshoes!

  6. #6
    Senior Member
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    Nobblies at low psi are for serious off road MTB courses, and the drag you will get on roads/canals will drag. Look for durable road tires. I use Schwalbe marathon at 80 psi on the back, and a slightly less bombproof Specialized sport at 95 psi on the front on my highbrid. No worries after a year of commuting/medium rides. A track pump is another good idea for easy weekly top up's.

  7. #7
    Junior Member
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    Dec 2016
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    I have the 2016 version of the Whyte Dorset which I bought end of Feb this year. I've done just over 3,000 miles including riding from Poole to Lands End and back in three days. It's has only had the 6 week service and apart from one puncture, I have had no problems with it. I find it a comfortable and solid ride.

  8. #8
    Senior Member coolboarder's Avatar
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    My first thought was: 'why put knobbly tyres on a road bike'? Then I viewed the bike and realised that it is a road/cyclo-cross hybrid. I have a cyclo-cross bike and have tyres which are slick in the centre and (slightly) knobbly on the edges. As the majority of my rides on that bike are on canal towpaths and forestry trails I don't need a lot of grip but the if I do hit a muddy patch the knobbly bits help drive me through and when on the road only the slick centre of the tread in is contact so it reduces rolling resistance.

    However, if I you're going to be using this only on the road and cycle paths then you will benefit from a slick road tyre, tread of any sort is of no use on the road even in the wet let alone knobbly bits, Lord knows why some manufacturers still put a bit of tread on them it is for appearance only. Everyone has their favourite, mine is Michelin Pro 4 Endurance which have a little bit of puncture protection but are very light and have a very low rolling resistance. They are being replaced by Michelin Power which doesn't have such wonderful reviews but there are some old stock Pro 4's on offer still.
    It doesn't matter how many times you fall down, its how times many you get back up that count.

  9. #9
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    Well done for taking up Road cycling. I cannot comment on the bike personally, as long as it has two wheels a saddle and some brakes you'll be fine, don't worry too much about the make/model at this stage.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Gasper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DylanRogers View Post
    Well done for taking up Road cycling. I cannot comment on the bike personally, as long as it has two wheels a saddle and some brakes you'll be fine, don't worry too much about the make/model at this stage.
    Well said, Dylan
    "Go forth and ride your bike". Courtesy of Me 2015.

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