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  1. #1
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    Technology evolution acceleration.

    It's a bluddy nuisance! Even when I was a lad, 152 years ago, things stayed rather the same for decades. Bikes changed only very gradually and many rode a bike they'd had for 20 or 30 years with no need to feel deprived for a lack of functionality.

    But these days the technology (although infested with, and driven by, consumerism) does throw up a constant series of genuine improvements. I recall my pleasure at the contrast between riding my old racing bike of 25 years and the ride on a modern machine with STI gear levers, a high degree of compliance yet an obvious improvement in getting one's pedal pushes to the back wheel without energy loss due to frame flex, leaden-wheel and all the rest. Then there's modern tyres.......

    But the trouble is that this constant improvement goes on! The Trek Domane bikes I have are very fine in terms of the aforementioned features - comfortable, fast and efficient. But always there remains a niggle or two - a harsher front end than rear end, for example; a limitation on the tyre size as fatter yet super-efficient tyres are invented; no electronic gears of the latest ilk that need no cables! All these improvements can now be had .... at a price.

    Perhaps it's just the consumer meme got a hadden of my wetware .... but these days I do have technology-lust for those genuine improvements, even though I be Lataxe Ludd and continue to mock the silly gizmo and fandangles of which so many are enamoured. (But I do have modern lights; and fancy bells; and even non-leaking bidons that don't pull your expensive crowns and bridges out as you bite madly at their nipples when trying to get a sook).

    I have given my wallet over to the ladywife, who keeps a very tight grip on such things.

    Lataxe

  2. #2
    Senior Member Lee C's Avatar
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    When ever new tech hits the market and I'm tempted i ask myself if it's a need or a want 9 out of 10 times the answer is want

  3. #3
    Senior Member VLAD (the Friendly Vamp)'s Avatar
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    Better spent than leaving it for the kids - at least you get to enjoy something yourself for once.
    NOT logging in every and each visit now.
    Going to have to BITE someone soon.
    Amicabili Lamia

  4. #4
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    I'll stick to STI methinks; accept no compromises, i'm the real luddy here, though i wouldn't say no to traction control, ride by wire, and corner ABS.

  5. #5
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    My father says "if you really want it, wait til tomorrow til buying it". Oddly the feeling usually has gone over night!

    Oh, and by the way Lataxe the new 2017 Domane has trickery in the fork to make the front end less harsh. Go on, you know you want to...
    "Training is also a battle" - Kim Jong-Un

  6. #6
    Senior Member coolboarder's Avatar
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    The only thing on my new bike which is not an improvement is the 11 speed cassette. While all manufacturers insist on starting with an 11 sprocket, which no-one in the real world needs, there is no increase in available gears or increments between them and the potential is wasted. Electronic gears are a very marginal gain and solving a problem which doesn't really exist but we all need new toys to play with from time to time. The balance between weight, compliance, stiffness, aerodynamics is a large step above anything I've have before.

    I'm not convinced by the tyre argument, the laws of physics can't be undone and I really can't see a 'fatter super efficient tyre' being invented which gives anyone any benefit other than plodders with dodgy backs.
    It doesn't matter how many times you fall down, its how times many you get back up that count.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Gasper's Avatar
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    I am not an "early adopter" of the latest technology, I like to let others test it first and iron out the niggles for a few years. Then prices fall, and I may buy in if other people like it in the real world. So with wireless gear changing, the latest versions may be lighter, cheaper and more reliable and finally worth trying.
    "Go forth and ride your bike". Courtesy of Me 2015.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by PRSboy View Post
    My father says "if you really want it, wait til tomorrow til buying it". Oddly the feeling usually has gone over night!

    Oh, and by the way Lataxe the new 2017 Domane has trickery in the fork to make the front end less harsh. Go on, you know you want to...
    I yam with yer ole dad, believing in the power of delayed gratification, which is often sated by something completely other than the first object of one's passing lust. Still, it is easy to be mesmerized by glamorous glittery things. Mine eyes have recently been captured by the new Specialized Roubaix steeds, with effective boing in the front end. Luckily they are inadequate in having no mudguard eyes and a lowered front end, so the Tricrosses and Domanes live another year in my shed.

    That wireless gearing is singing a siren song though but.

    Lataxe, sinking in the consumer-bog and calling for help.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by coolboarder View Post
    The only thing on my new bike which is not an improvement is the 11 speed cassette. While all manufacturers insist on starting with an 11 sprocket, which no-one in the real world needs, there is no increase in available gears or increments between them and the potential is wasted.
    I disagree. I had to have an 11-speed rear end to replace the 9-speed rear end when I decided to get fully hydraulic brakes to replace the TRP HY/RD cable-pulled hydraulic callipers. Naturally I arranged the cogs to start with a proper top gear - 14-15-16-17-18-19-20-21-25-28-32. This gives close ratio at the high end with reasonable jumps at the low end, enabling a perfek cadence in all situations. The 9-speed cassette it replaced also started at 14 and ended at 32 but had gaps to big from 17-19 & 19-21, cogs used in the big ring of 52 (on a triple chainset).

    Quote Originally Posted by coolboarder View Post
    I'm not convinced by the tyre argument, the laws of physics can't be undone and I really can't see a 'fatter super efficient tyre' being invented which gives anyone any benefit other than plodders with dodgy backs.
    There are endless web pages devoted to the theory and test results of modern bicycle tyre design and the reasons/evidence showing that wider with less pressure is, up to a certain point, more efficient than narrower with more pressure, all other tings being equal. You need to ejercate yersen instead of hanging on to old wifey lore. :-)

    Lataxe, only part Ludd.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Gasper's Avatar
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    LBS guy demonstrated the new Roubaix "suspension" to me recently, the seat post dampens the bumps somehow. I don't feel particularly tempted as I have a 4 year old Roubaix for touring, and am enjoying the race bike handling at the moment.
    Last edited by Gasper; 30th December 2016 at 12:06 PM.
    "Go forth and ride your bike". Courtesy of Me 2015.

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