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  1. #1
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    Rear brake sticking

    Not quite sure if there's a problem with the gear cable or the spring mechanism, but when I apply the rear brake, the pads contact the rim as expected but they don't release properly and as a result, they rub.

    I've sprayed the spring with lube which has helped a bit and adjusted the brake cable tension but it's still not quite right.

    Does the cable need replacing or is there anything else I can do to improve things please?

    Cheers.

    In other news, I trued my first wheel the other day. Well, it wasn't that dramatic, but a spoke was lose so I put the bike on the trainer, adjusted the spoke whilst keeping the blade in position and used the brake pads to gauge things. Happy with the results.

  2. #2
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    I had this problem with my Argon18... turned out the cable was cr4p and had frayed after only a few months. Replaced it and all was well.
    "Training is also a battle" - Kim Jong-Un

  3. #3
    Senior Member coolboarder's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick1020 View Post
    Not quite sure if there's a problem with the gear cable or the spring mechanism, but when I apply the rear brake, the pads contact the rim as expected but they don't release properly and as a result, they rub.
    Assuming you mean brake not gear cable! Release the cable and see if the brake actually springs apart freely, if it does then clearly your problem is with the cable or the liner. It is probably best to replace the brake cable and outer anyway. However, I found when I change my stem the outer cover of the brake cable snagged on one of the face clamp bolts if I turned the wheel too far to the left and effectively applied the brake. I solved it by taking a couple of cm out of the loop that goes from the lever to the first cable stop.


    Cheers.

    In other news, I trued my first wheel the other day. Well, it wasn't that dramatic, but a spoke was lose so I put the bike on the trainer, adjusted the spoke whilst keeping the blade in position and used the brake pads to gauge things. Happy with the results.[/QUOTE]Well done, it is a simple job as you've found just try and make sure the tension is a equal as possible in all the spokes.
    It doesn't matter how many times you fall down, its how times many you get back up that count.

  4. #4
    Senior Member VLAD (the Friendly Vamp)'s Avatar
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    Might be that the bolt that holds the brake system to the bike is too TIGHT thus preventing the spring to release the pads from the rim.
    NOT logging in every and each visit now.
    Going to have to BITE someone soon.
    Amicabili Lamia

  5. #5
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    I've improved things by spraying and leaving overnight and redoing the tension. I think PRS may be right about the cable though so I'll probably replace that when I get the chance.

  6. #6
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    Finally got around to replacing the cable tonight. After removing the old cable, the calipers still didn't seem to release fully after being squeezed by hand. I taped up the pads and gave the spring and other moving parts good spray whilst moving the arms to allow good coverage.

    Putting the new cable in was a bit of a ball ache as it is internally routed and getting the cable through the small hole at the bottom of the down tube was more a case of luck than judgement. Saw a few YouTube vids which suggested using a hook tool to catch the cable as it passed but the hole on the 883 frame was nothing like the holes in the videos. Then had problems getting enough cable tension and being able to secure the cable. The way the rear direct mount brake cable is held in place seems a bit daft and was very fiddly, but I got there in the end.

    That's another first time job ticked off the list. I've replaced brake cables before but this was the first internally routed and direct mount one I have done.

  7. #7
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    Serviced my pedals too. Another ball ache getting them off the cranks, and yes I am aware of the direction each side needs to go to loosen. And also yes, I did grease the threads when I put them on. Ended up cutting my hand but soldiered on. Both pedals had run dry so cleaned up, reapplied grease to the axles, housing and threads and popped them back on.

    Another job done!

  8. #8
    Senior Member Boxhilljunkie's Avatar
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    Blinking Nora Nick you haven't had your bike long...the thing with fully built bikes is you don't know what parts they use...cables...there are good ones and crap ones
    this also goes for the cable housing too...
    inner cables I tend to go for the stainless polished ones and the housing I go for the ones that have a lining and sealed ends ...
    i always smear grease along the whole cable before I insert for extra added lube..
    brakes are pretty important ....so it's something you don't really want to go cheap on!!
    i can't comment on the calipers...as I really don't know...never had this prob ever!!

  9. #9
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    Generally folk overtighten pedals. I've found a very modest tweak holds them secure, particularly as they are threaded to not loosen under forward pedalling.
    "Training is also a battle" - Kim Jong-Un

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boxhilljunkie View Post
    Blinking Nora Nick you haven't had your bike long...the thing with fully built bikes is you don't know what parts they use...cables...there are good ones and crap ones
    this also goes for the cable housing too...
    inner cables I tend to go for the stainless polished ones and the housing I go for the ones that have a lining and sealed ends ...
    i always smear grease along the whole cable before I insert for extra added lube..
    brakes are pretty important ....so it's something you don't really want to go cheap on!!
    i can't comment on the calipers...as I really don't know...never had this prob ever!!
    The original cable was an Ultegra one as it had the silicone coating which, ime tends to fray and fall off at the earliest opportunity. I used a Shimano replacement, but just a standard one and coated in a little grease before installing.

    The calipers are releasing a bit better today. I can move them a little bit with my hand after releasing the brake, but it is a lot better than before and there's no rub so I'll just see how it goes. Need to get the rear wheel trued as it's a little bit out so when that's sorted, I'll be happy.

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