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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gasper View Post
    Carbon is as strong as steel and much lighter and stiffer.
    Not sure about that! It can be strong in the designed area, but hit a carbon tube with a hammer and it'll go straight through. Not so with steel, and with Ti it'll bounce back and hit you in the face lol.

    I personally don't find carbon comfy - and unlike most folks have ridden (and still have!) steel (531), ali (Vitus 797 screwed and glued), carbon and Ti. Just ask yourself why it's only carbon frames that need 'elastomer inserts' to reduce the road shocks...

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by OETKB-YENTC View Post
    Not sure about that! It can be strong in the designed area, but hit a carbon tube with a hammer and it'll go straight through. Not so with steel, and with Ti it'll bounce back and hit you in the face lol.

    I personally don't find carbon comfy - and unlike most folks have ridden (and still have!) steel (531), ali (Vitus 797 screwed and glued), carbon and Ti. Just ask yourself why it's only carbon frames that need 'elastomer inserts' to reduce the road shocks...
    I'm no expert and feel free to put me right but wouldn't it be more of a case of 'because they can'? Inserting anything I the same manner in a steel etc frame is going to be a bit tricky no?

  3. #13
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    Moulton pioneered rubber inserts in a steel bicycle frame to soften the ride, back in the 60's IIRC. Quite complex, weird looking, super cool and I want one!

    I suspect also a marketing element to it. For example, the inserts in the Specialised Roubaix 'zerts' don't do anything, its actually the frame itself which flexes.
    "If you act like you know what you are doing, you can do anything you want- except neurosurgery"- Sharon Stone

  4. #14
    Senior Member The return of Marty Wild's Avatar
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    Not sure if it has been mentioned, but get a bike fit! Was a eureka moment getting one when buying my super Sunday best bike. Couldn't believe I had already been road-cycling for over 5 years before getting one. The comfort on the bike fitted bike compared to what I had thrown together is night and day!
    "Iím glad you asked me twice, you see I am a bilingual, Iím a bilingual illiterateÖ I canít read in two languages."

  5. #15
    Senior Member Boxhilljunkie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OETKB-YENTC View Post
    Not sure about that! It can be strong in the designed area, but hit a carbon tube with a hammer and it'll go straight through. Not so with steel, and with Ti it'll bounce back and hit you in the face lol.

    I personally don't find carbon comfy - and unlike most folks have ridden (and still have!) steel (531), ali (Vitus 797 screwed and glued), carbon and Ti. Just ask yourself why it's only carbon frames that need 'elastomer inserts' to reduce the road shocks...
    Oknot steel but defo stronger than Alloy , which a lot of frames are made from...Im sure I've said it before but when one of our riding buddy smashed into a motor a few years back..his frame buckled and creased and split...he had carbon forks...and they where perfect ....I went round them with a x60 scope ..not a crack anywhere!!

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by portia View Post
    Right. A silly question. How do I test the bikes that are being sold online?
    Tricky. I ordered my Canyon not having actually seen one in the flesh as it were let alone tried one. They have an online bike fit program which is OK but will never replace actually trying a bike. I took the plunge and it's worked out fine but for peace of mind try one first.
    All the gear and no idea.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by portia View Post
    Right. A silly question. How do I test the bikes that are being sold online?
    This is where a good imagination helps

    Ribble do have pop up shops so depending on where you are, you may be able to visit one.

    Some online stores may have policies that allow you to change spec or model before a certain time. I know Ribble are pretty good with this. They give you 30 days to use the bike and will change components for free and you can even change bike models as long as the original bike is returned in excellent condition.

    It's always worth checking out each store's T&Cs. Distance selling regulations will give you protection if the store is not very co-operative when dealing with potential issues and faults with the bike.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by OETKB-YENTC View Post
    Not sure about that! It can be strong in the designed area, but hit a carbon tube with a hammer and it'll go straight through. Not so with steel, and with Ti it'll bounce back and hit you in the face lol.

    I personally don't find carbon comfy - and unlike most folks have ridden (and still have!) steel (531), ali (Vitus 797 screwed and glued), carbon and Ti. Just ask yourself why it's only carbon frames that need 'elastomer inserts' to reduce the road shocks...
    Comfort, strength, compliance/stiffness and so forth are as much attributes of the frame design & build as of it's material. The advantage with carbon is that it can be configured at micro-level to provide any and all of these ride characteristics in a very fine tuned and balanced fashion. In fact, the material itself greatly increases the design possibilities compared to metals.

    Steel, aluminium and titanium can be configured in terms of their alloy with other metals as well as in terms of tube shape, thickness and cross-section. But they can't be tweaked to the degree that various layups of carbon fibres in a matrix of various resins can be tweaked.

    I have seen steel and aluminium frames that were designed with tubes so thin that any force other than those involved in riding the bike would easily damage them. Very thin walls in the middle of top or down-tube; stays that were similarly delicate if given a side-knock or even a tighter clamp of an old-fashioned back light. Carbon frames can, of course, be shattered by such blows; but it generally takes a much harder blow than it does to dent or bend a thin steel or aluminium tube.

    In all events, I enjoy the compliant comfort of modern carbon frames much more than the "spring" of steel - especially when that frame is also super-stiff in the direction of the pedalling forces and so accelerated easily, rather than giving a twang, shudder and creak before doing so like many a metal frame. I will mention those Vitus 797 frames, which felt like a series of noodles knitted by a furious knitter of Dent when a bit drunk (especially when sprinting it down Dentdale for the Dent village sign).

    Lataxe

  9. #19
    Senior Member portia's Avatar
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    Just an update. I've ordered the Ribble. So looking forward to it!!!

  10. #20
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    Excellent- what spec did you go for?
    "If you act like you know what you are doing, you can do anything you want- except neurosurgery"- Sharon Stone

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