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  1. #1
    Senior Member The return of Marty Wild's Avatar
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    Getting a new bike out of neccesity!

    My Bianchi Hybrid was never the same after a tumble on the ice in Feb. Have been using my old road bike (Pinarello) this summer for the daily hack. But need something else for the winter riding, something I don't mind getting super dirty and leaving locked up.

    Taking a lot of slack for bringing my bike into the office from my colleagues.

    Thinking about getting one of these, ideally I want discs brakes (prefer proper hydraulics) and super fat tyres for cycling in grim conditions in the dark.

    https://www.tredz.co.uk/.Specialized...0aAprrEALw_wcB

    These are the new model, the old one had good write ups. Needs to come in under a grand really so it is covered under my household insurance, unlike my good bikes. Any suggestions welcomed...
    "Iím glad you asked me twice, you see I am a bilingual, Iím a bilingual illiterateÖ I canít read in two languages."

  2. #2
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    Looks good! I'd not get too hung up on a gravel bike per se- marketing guff- just get a sensible road bike and stick some 28s on it.

    Hydraulic discs have disadvantages as they are a pain to set up, extra weight, air bubbles etc- for road use I think mechanical ones would be fine.

    Have a look at the Whyte range- some lovely bikes in there, UK designed at least. https://www.whyte.bike/sussex
    Maybe Boardman too?
    "If you act like you know what you are doing, you can do anything you want- except neurosurgery"- Sharon Stone

  3. #3
    Senior Member The return of Marty Wild's Avatar
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    I want 35s on it, PRS. I am not buying into Gravel bike hype etc, just like big fat tyres when cycling in poor conditions in the dark. That's the tyre width I've always ran on my winter hacks in the past, it just used to be that that had meant Hybrids and MTBs.

    I only judge the discs on past experience of a mate's cheap Giant with cable pulls, they were shocking! Turning the pull force into a push is inefficient and wasn't done well on his at least.

    Yeah have thought of Whyte, Boardman, Focus is it?!
    "Iím glad you asked me twice, you see I am a bilingual, Iím a bilingual illiterateÖ I canít read in two languages."

  4. #4
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    Such a bike (wide tyre clearance, facility for mudguards and pannier racks) is winter necessity for commuting. A so-called gravel bike is also likely to be a bit more upright & stable (better for riding in traffic) and to have sealed bearings in the wheels and BB; perhaps even the headset.

    I believe you're wise also to want hydraulic discs rather than cable discs. In reality, they aren't hard to set up if you have the initial patience. One must merely be careful when loading in or topping up the hydraulic fluid. Having had both cable and full hydraulic I would opine that the hydraulics are easier to set up than the cables, as the latter can be a pain to set so that the pads don't rub the disc. Hydraulics seem far less prone to that, perhaps because the pads are actuated from both sides of the calliper rather than just one side, as with many cable discs.

    Hydraulics also have a much better feel in terms of modulating the brake pressure, with a lot less hand gripping than any cable-actuated brake.

    Does Cambridgeshire suffer a lot of ice in winter? I seem to recall it might because of the Continental effect. If so, Consider Schwalbe Marathon 35mm ice-tyres, with the TCT studs. They are heavy (nearly 1kg each) a little draggy (not much though) and sound like rice crispies. They are pretty bomb proof (as with all varieties of Marathons) but also very good not just on the frost and ice but also on the slimy cow muck, leaf-rot and other thin slippery coatings found on winter tarmac. I rode them most of last winter, even though there was very little ice, and found them most reassuring even if they are slightly (and it is slightly) slower than ordinary winter tyres.

    Lataxe

  5. #5
    Senior Member The return of Marty Wild's Avatar
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    Wow, I am actually staggered to have Lataxe agree with me on anything. Thanks, Mr L! A tough, big tyred road bike is my ideal for the winter drudgery. It does indeed have facilities for guards and what have you.

    Sadly only the high end versions, i.e. the Comp and the S-Works have hydraulic crakes unfortunately, guess it is something I could replace later down the line.

    Have seen minus 16c here two years in a row a while back. Last two winters however, -6c was the lowest I found myself cycling in.
    "Iím glad you asked me twice, you see I am a bilingual, Iím a bilingual illiterateÖ I canít read in two languages."

  6. #6
    Senior Member The return of Marty Wild's Avatar
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    I remember you speaking highly of the studded Schwalbes!
    "Iím glad you asked me twice, you see I am a bilingual, Iím a bilingual illiterateÖ I canít read in two languages."

  7. #7
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    for cycling in grim conditions in the dark.
    A certain phrase springs to mind and it rhymes with duck fat.
    All the gear and no idea.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Muffin View Post
    A certain phrase springs to mind and it rhymes with duck fat.
    There is surprising pleasure in cycling after dark in adverse conditions. You're in a small island of fug, your front light creating a small world into which you pedal, swirling with rain going in queer directions and perhaps the odd peculiar item blown off a washing line. In your weather-proof garb you are snug since you generate heat at the rate you require. The weather bounces off and so you feel you're somehow in charge or in control of things. You are a brave and intrepid adventurer who laughs in the face of the low pressure system!

    Long ago a small group of us used to cycle in autumn from Lancaster to Grasmere on a Friday evening after work, to stay the weekend at the Youth Hostel, where we drank too much and vied aggressively with the locals for the pool table in one of the local pubs. Our little island of light, sweat and gossip on the way up was just as pleasant on the way home of a Sunday night, despite the hangovers, as we could recount our exciting pub adventures, enhancing, altering and inflating the tales of what actually happened to our benefit.

    Try it; you'll like it.

    Lataxe

  9. #9
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    Try it; you'll like it.
    Nah, cycling in the dark in the rain recipe for accident.
    All the gear and no idea.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Gasper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Muffin View Post
    Nah, cycling in the dark in the rain recipe for accident.
    I, also find myself agreeing with Lataxe. Cycling in the dark and wet is no problem with the right gear, I do it every winter out of necessity, it's either that or stay indoors (no thanks). Not on main roads though, preferably. It makes you feel epic, for want of a better word.

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