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  1. #21
    Senior Member Mr Q's Avatar
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    So at the end of the day everyone is different there is no ideal figure. I think it’s a bad idea to limit your efforts on the bike to a specific heart rate. Caveat to that is as long as you have no known heart defects. If for example your in a race and your on the rivet. If you look at your HR and it’s higher than you would like you may give up. Best not to look at it. Never stop when you feel tired stop when the ride is finished.

  2. #22
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    Very timely thread this. I recently (yesterday) purchased a Garmin Forerunner which is the first HR gadget I’ve used. I put it on just before I went to bed and looked this morning and my average RHR was 40! I thought it would simply be down to only having had it on while sleeping at that point.

    Checking again now and stats for last 4 hours has it at 42.

    Obviously I know it’s not the most scientific method but seems lower than I thought it would be.

  3. #23
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    Sounds right Tom if you are a fit endurance rider...

    @Mr Q... I did use HR on the Velothon Cardiff to pace myself. I knew I could sustain around 145 for ages, so kept around that, allowing it to rise on hills. It meant that I was being passed by folk at the start, but I found myself passing them again in the latter stages when I had some gas left in the tank.

    Apparently Indurain had a resting HR of 28... which is more or less dead.
    "If you act like you know what you are doing, you can do anything you want- except neurosurgery"- Sharon Stone

  4. #24
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    Increased fitness does tend to result in lower heart rates, but it's not the only marker. My Dad has a fairly low heart rate (55-60 bpm at rest) but is certainly not fit. He used to be fairly active a few decades ago with golf and Sunday league football, but very little since then. He's a heavy smoker and occasional drinker too.

    Why does his heart rate not seem to follow conventional thinking?

    Could my low heart rate be down to the same genetics, even though I'm reasonably fit?

  5. #25
    Senior Member The return of Marty Wild's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Logan View Post
    Very timely thread this. I recently (yesterday) I put it on just before I went to bed and looked this morning and my average RHR was 40! I thought it would simply be down to only having had it on while sleeping at that point.
    You recorded an activity as you slept as it were?

    Quote Originally Posted by Nick1020 View Post
    occasional drinker too.
    Is that to say most on here don't drink then do we think? I have a few brews come the weekend, do we think that is that bad for fitness?
    "Iím glad you asked me twice, you see I am a bilingual, Iím a bilingual illiterateÖ I canít read in two languages."

  6. #26
    Senior Member The return of Marty Wild's Avatar
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    This just in from GCN.... about booze...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=quy05UqNQgU

    Not watched it yet.
    "Iím glad you asked me twice, you see I am a bilingual, Iím a bilingual illiterateÖ I canít read in two languages."

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by The return of Marty Wild View Post
    You recorded an activity as you slept as it were?



    Is that to say most on here don't drink then do we think? I have a few brews come the weekend, do we think that is that bad for fitness?
    No, it was more to reference the lifestyle of my dad. Heavy smoker, no exercise and drinks too. He has what is generally thought of as a healthy heart rate but his lifestyle is far from healthy. Quite a few people his age go to the gym, don't smoke, eat healthy etc.

    As it is, I'm rather partial to a glass or two or red wine and the occasional ale. Although, I take regular exercise, like most others on the forum.

    I suppose the amount drunk and how often could well effect one's fitness. Then there's the elevated risks of developing conditions and diseases associated with drinking too much.

  8. #28
    Senior Member Mr Q's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PRSboy View Post
    Sounds right Tom if you are a fit endurance rider...

    @Mr Q... I did use HR on the Velothon Cardiff to pace myself. I knew I could sustain around 145 for ages, so kept around that, allowing it to rise on hills. It meant that I was being passed by folk at the start, but I found myself passing them again in the latter stages when I had some gas left in the tank.

    Apparently Indurain had a resting HR of 28... which is more or less dead.
    Yes PRS boy good for keeping a lid on things for a long event. I was more thinking about giving up in race if you feel tired and look at your computer see a high heart rate then think I can’t sustain that and give up. Best just to ignore heart rate say shut up legs and keep riding hard. Your body can do more than you think it can usually.

  9. #29
    Senior Member coolboarder's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick1020 View Post
    My Dad has a fairly low heart rate (55-60 bpm at rest) but is certainly not fit. He used to be fairly active a few decades ago with golf and Sunday league football, but very little since then. He's a heavy smoker and occasional drinker too.

    Why does his heart rate not seem to follow conventional thinking?
    It would probably be lower if he was fit and healthy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nick1020 View Post
    I suppose the amount drunk and how often could well effect one's fitness. Then there's the elevated risks of developing conditions and diseases associated with drinking too much.
    I've always been aware that I was more likely to suffer palpitations if I drank alcohol but since I've developed AF I am now much more aware that even a moderate amount of alcohol, especially after heavy exercise, can be seriously detrimental. Red wine may be beneficial for some forms of heart disease i.e. coronary artery disease but not for arrhythmias. It does not stop me drinking in moderation but I am aware that there is no safe limit and it is a balance with a lifestyle choice we all have to make.
    It doesn't matter how many times you fall down, its how times many you get back up that count.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Q View Post
    Yes PRS boy good for keeping a lid on things for a long event. I was more thinking about giving up in race if you feel tired and look at your computer see a high heart rate then think I can’t sustain that and give up. Best just to ignore heart rate say shut up legs and keep riding hard. Your body can do more than you think it can usually.
    Yeah agree to some degree. Paralysis through analysis oooh golf term ssshh.

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