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  1. #11
    Senior Member VLAD (the Friendly Vamp)'s Avatar
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    You have to remember that a horse has a brain - not a very well functional brain - but a brain.

    Its thoughts normally go like this - eat grass, eat grass, have a dump, eat grass, eat grass, - WHOOO - WHAT THE FUCK WAS THAT - ONLY MY SHADOW. - PHEW. -, eat grass, eat grass, dump etc etc.

    They are a flight animal and will spook at anything even professional trained riders can have an off when a horse spooks.

    The wifes older horse nearly broke my ribs a few months ago - he was in the stable and I was feeding him and he just spooked as a swallow flew into the stable, he turned around and slammed me against the wall, taking me right off my feet. It bloody hurt and I was lucky he did not crush me. Bloody thing didn't even know what he had done even after I punched him to the chest to move out of the way so I could escape.

    One day - he will tread on my foot and that will hurt.
    "Life is too short to have anything but delusional notions about yourself."
    Gene Simmons - Kiss

    God - why am I so great !!!


  2. #12
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    I was up on the trails on my MTB a while ago and saw two horseriders approaching. Trying to do the right thing, I moved over to the far side of the trail and slowed down over a couple of ruts, only to fall off.

    Cue howls of laughter from the ladies on the horses who brought the horses over to meet the stupid bloke lying on the floor. Apparently one girl was keen for her horse to see a cyclist and bike as he'd not seen one up close before. Glad I could be of some help.
    "If you act like you know what you are doing, you can do anything you want- except neurosurgery"- Sharon Stone

  3. #13
    Senior Member ibbo68's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OETKB-YENTC View Post
    I saw that, and have to wonder how she wasn't aware it was on as it was an annual event that was probably well advertised with lots of warning signs out as well. Or maybe she was.....
    Whilst not condoning in any way the actions of the cyclists you do have to ask yourself that question.Was she aware of the event and if so was it really a good idea to go on that stretch of road knowing there'd be loads of triathletes out?I personally always slow down for horses both on the bike and in my car but I can understand why someone in a race wouldn't.
    It's been stated in other posts that sometimes horse riders don't help themselves and I can think of two incidents where I've had conflict and on both occasions it was clearly the horse riders fault!

    1.Riding the North Face Trail in Grizedale Forest,Lake District.Rode around a bend and over a little hump when I saw three horses coming up the other way.I managed to stop before hitting the front one and the rider shouted(in a REALLY posh voice)"You are aware that this is a Facking Bridleway and you should slow down and give way"!?
    To which I replied in my very broadest Yorkshire voice"no love,I'm aware that this is a purpose built Mountain Bike trail and you are not only riding it the wrong way but should actually be on it at all"
    Her reply?
    "Just Facking slow down"
    Clearly in the wrong but still carried on up the trail regardless.

    2.At the bottom of the Cul-De-Sac we live on are some steps down to shared use trail.It's one of the loops off The Trans-Pennine Trail.Where the steps meet the Trail it's about 2m wide and elevated slightly as it passes a Fishing Pond.Myself,my son and our dog were on the steps,about halfway down when a Horse appeared,saw us and got spooked.The woman went crazy saying we should be aware of horses etc.She didn't seem too happy when I told her that if her horse was spooked so easily she should maybe give the access areas a wider berth rather than riding close the the hedges that obscure them.
    A little bit of common sense can go a long way on both sides.
    The Horsey set can be a little bit high and mighty around here(not all of them) and there's been a long running feud between them and MTBers in a local wood that just requires a bit of common sense to end but it seems that a particular Riding School don't have any.

    To go back to the OP though the Triathletes in question are dicks!

  4. #14
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    I don't think it was a closed road event, so she had every right to be there. Had motorcyclists for example passed a cyclist like that, we would rightly be baying for blood.

    Regardless of personal experiences, we need to recognize twattery, otherwise we fall into the same trap as drivers who say "cyclists dont help themselves, riding two abreast, on the road next to the cycle path, no helmets/hi viz blah etc"
    "If you act like you know what you are doing, you can do anything you want- except neurosurgery"- Sharon Stone

  5. #15
    Senior Member The return of Marty Wild's Avatar
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    Vlad seems to be the resident horse whisper.
    "Iím glad you asked me twice, you see I am a bilingual, Iím a bilingual illiterateÖ I canít read in two languages."

  6. #16
    Senior Member coolboarder's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ibbo68 View Post
    Was she aware of the event and if so was it really a good idea to go on that stretch of road knowing there'd be loads of triathletes out?
    Quote Originally Posted by PRSboy View Post
    I don't think it was a closed road event, so she had every right to be there. "
    The roads are not closed nor are they even signed to say there is an event. Its runs on roads I frequent and have a few times got caught up in it - its a laugh to burn off all these guys on tri bikes on a road bike, well they're not real cyclists are they?

    I recall once goign down to the start at Dorney Lake (where they held to Olympic rowing events) to hijack the bike ride and had the temerity to ride across the transition area which produced a telling off over the PA system to get off or face being DQ'd. Not much chance of that as I hadn't actually entered!
    Last edited by coolboarder; 4 Weeks Ago at 3:12 PM.
    It doesn't matter how many times you fall down, its how times many you get back up that count.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Muffin View Post
    Indeed. A few weeks ago was on a ride down a back road and saw a horse and rider well ahead of me and she was riding pretty much in middle of road. Anyway when I got closer I slowed right down then stopped about 20 yards away as a car was coming in other direction so room be tight. As the car passed the horse it went mental rearing up etc. I stayed stationary until the rider got horse under control then cautiously rode past, as I did she said the horse was a bit crazy(!). I politely pointed out that if a horse was known to be a bit crazy then maybe public roads not the best place to ride them. She wasn't overly impressed.
    That's a fair comment. If a horse has issues, then the rider needs to consider the safety of other roads users, but at the same time, the only way for horses to gain more experience on the roads is to use them. They still deserve protection, much the same as us on two wheels (or any number of wheels), regardless of experience or confidence.

    The missus told me about a local incident involving a cyclist and horse that the horse rider posted on Facebook. There was no video evidence to back her claim up, but her side of the story claimed that a cyclist sped past her and her nervous horse which then reared up and she struggled to get it back under control.

    Anyway, the lack of evidence to support her claims made it impossible to know whether it happened in the manner she described, but it got me thinking about whether she was in the wrong for having a horse that she described as 'nervous' on the road. Surely there's a way to improve the behaviour of such horses before taking the extra risk of going out on the road?

  8. #18
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    Yes a bit of a catch 22 situation, in that you can't get a horse used to traffic etc without exposing them to it. The rider was a mature lady, not a kid. I tend to find it's younger women riders who tend to get a bit stroppy whereas this woman had situation in control.
    All the gear and no idea.

  9. #19
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    Seeing horse riders using their mobile phones annoys me!

  10. #20
    Senior Member VLAD (the Friendly Vamp)'s Avatar
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    Seeing horses trying to use a phone really annoys me. They have problems with trying to swipe the screens with their hooves.
    "Life is too short to have anything but delusional notions about yourself."
    Gene Simmons - Kiss

    God - why am I so great !!!


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