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  1. #1
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    VickyP splits with hubby.

    Sad, particularly given the crap she went through when the team found out about them.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-44705646

  2. #2
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    Oh dear, never mind.
    All the gear and no idea.

  3. #3
    Senior Member coolboarder's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OETKB-YENTC View Post
    Sad, particularly given the crap she went through when the team found out about them.
    I wonder how much this has to do with her mental state which was always fragile but has apparently been made worse by her altitude sickness on Everest.
    It doesn't matter how many times you fall down, its how times many you get back up that count.

  4. #4
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    I don't think anyone should feel depressed (although I appreciate there is a lot more to depression than that) about having to pull out of an Everest attempt, its massively gruelling and very dangerous.

    Must be so hard to live out your relationship in the public eye.
    "If you act like you know what you are doing, you can do anything you want- except neurosurgery"- Sharon Stone

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by PRSboy View Post
    I don't think anyone should feel depressed (although I appreciate there is a lot more to depression than that) about having to pull out of an Everest attempt, its massively gruelling and very dangerous.
    Mental illness is more than just having bad stuff going on, it's more of a 'physical' illness that manifests itself mentally - if you follow! In Vicky's case the physical side was brought on by the altitude.

  6. #6
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    Absolutely... its horrific. I've a friend who is going through hell with depression at the moment. Not helped by the usual bottle it up/snap out of it/stiff upper lip Brit attitudes.
    "If you act like you know what you are doing, you can do anything you want- except neurosurgery"- Sharon Stone

  7. #7
    Senior Member coolboarder's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OETKB-YENTC View Post
    Mental illness is more than just having bad stuff going on, it's more of a 'physical' illness that manifests itself mentally - if you follow! In Vicky's case the physical side was brought on by the altitude.
    Indeed. I am usually mentally robust but realise that it is only by careful control of positive thought processes that I remain sane and had a 'get a grip' attitude to other people with mental illness.

    In the spring having smashed myself up skiing, then injuring a knee and getting Aussie flu, I was physically at a very low ebb. As cyclists we get up and carry on but sometimes just don't realise how much it takes out of us. Then I was hit by a perfect storm of 4 bad months in business takings to the extent I was having to dip into savings to pay the bills, being sued for slander and the realisation that I was not immortal, was nearly 68 and that I didn't have an easy retirement strategy. I suffered from depression and anxiety attacks and suicidal thoughts. As it is the business picked up dramatically, the legal case was settled inexpensively and I'm physically mending. I'm now back to my usual coping self, albeit the retirement conundrum still hangs over me, and wonder how I could have become so low but it was a wake up call that we all have a breaking point and it is not that easy to just 'get a grip'.

    I imagine Vicky P coped with her mental illness by concentrating on her cycling career and subsequent ventures but she also was probably physically and mentally affected by altitude sickness then a difficult relationship and it becomes a spiral out of which it is difficult to see a way, however logically you try to approach it.
    Last edited by coolboarder; 4th July 2018 at 10:29 AM.
    It doesn't matter how many times you fall down, its how times many you get back up that count.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by coolboarder View Post
    Indeed. I am usually mentally robust but realise that it is only by careful control of positive thought processes that I remain sane and had a 'get a grip' attitude to other people with mental illness.

    In the spring having smashed myself up skiing, then injuring a knee and getting Aussie flu, I was physically at a very low ebb. As cyclists we get up and carry on but sometimes just don't realise how much it takes out of us. Then I was hit by a perfect storm of 4 bad months in business takings to the extent I was having to dip into savings to pay the bills, being sued for slander and the realisation that I was not immortal, was nearly 68 and that I didn't have an easy retirement strategy. I suffered from depression and anxiety attacks and suicidal thoughts. As it is the business picked up dramatically, the legal case was settled inexpensively and I'm physically mending. I'm now back to my usual coping self, albeit the retirement conundrum still hangs over me, and wonder how I could have become so low but it was a wake up call that we all have a breaking point and it is not that easy to just 'get a grip'.

    I imagine Vicky P coped with her mental illness by concentrating on her cycling career and subsequent ventures but she also was probably physically and mentally affected by altitude sickness then a difficult relationship and it becomes a spiral out of which it is difficult to see a way, however logically you try to approach it.
    Blimey CB... sounds like a nightmare, great to hear things picked up and you are back on the straight and narrow.

    At least we were here to cheer you up with witty banter...
    "If you act like you know what you are doing, you can do anything you want- except neurosurgery"- Sharon Stone

  9. #9
    Senior Member VLAD (the Friendly Vamp)'s Avatar
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    Having personally sat in a chair and talked about my life and how I feel - I feel for anyone who has problems with depression and or other mental health issues.

    Males in particular tend to as CB says, bottle it up and keep the stiff upper lip. That's why more males commit suicide than females.

    I found the whole experience quite easy to talk about and she found that the job I did was very stressful and being overworked did not help. I had to explain my feeling after watching a set of loads of explicit child porn evidence that some bloke had on his computer and how it made me feel. I had to record all the actions for the Court files so they can be read out in detail as you cant play the videos in Court.

    That hurt, as being a parent myself.

    Also stuff from the Forces came out as being PTSD and with the stuff above I was keeping it all in and needed an escape valve.

    Afterwards I felt better, It took months of sitting in a chair,but still have days, where I remember what brought it all on and things come back to you.

    anyways,

    So Vicki is now free...……. Wonder if she wants a date ???
    "Life is too short to have anything but delusional notions about yourself."
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    God - why am I so great !!!


  10. #10
    Senior Member coolboarder's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PRSboy View Post
    At least we were here to cheer you up with witty banter...
    It was one of my coping strategies I admit. But you may have not noticed but I'm a bit more careful about making potentially defamatory comments after being sued for something I said on another forum.

    Quote Originally Posted by VLAD (the Friendly Vamp) View Post
    Having personally sat in a chair and talked about my life and how I feel - I feel for anyone who has problems with depression and or other mental health issues.
    I found that when I had the courage to admit to my problems on a veterinary forum how many other's also had the courage to admit to their own issues. A problem shared may not be a problem solved or even halved but it certainly helps.
    Last edited by coolboarder; 4th July 2018 at 12:56 PM.
    It doesn't matter how many times you fall down, its how times many you get back up that count.

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