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  1. #1
    Senior Member portia's Avatar
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    Choosing a frame

    Inspired by Nick's thread, I am curious what factors do you take into account when choosing a frame. The obvious ones are:
    - material /weight
    -geometry
    -shape (eg. Aero)
    - designed for internal or external cabling


    Anything else?

  2. #2
    Senior Member ibbo68's Avatar
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    Initially for me it's looks.
    I then check/compare Geometry.

  3. #3
    Senior Member VLAD (the Friendly Vamp)'s Avatar
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    Dont forget the aspects of the frame - do you want a stiff frame or a bit of compliance, road buzz asorbance aero or endurance.

    When I brought my new bike last year - I was between the Trek Madone and the Domane (Always been a Trek rider) - went the Domane after several weeks of faffing around due to the izo flex in the tubes to reduce the road buzz - and YES it does work.

    I wanted endurance more than sport due to my age and ability to have the comfort in the position on the bike.

    I did not want to be hunched up and have to much of a front end drop, as due to a neck injury, I cant keep my neck up without feeling pain after an hour on the bike, so went for a higher front end. Its great.

    Then I had several options to choose from - I went top end - Why - well I wanted the best for the money and I had the money to spend on it. I was lucky.

    If I was doing it now..... with normal amounts of money ???? I probley would have gone for the 1 level down from top.
    "Life is too short to have anything but delusional notions about yourself."
    Gene Simmons - Kiss

    God - why am I so great !!!


  4. #4
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    I think a good understanding of geometry is more important than most realise. I've been lucky with my Argon18 Nitrogen, as the geometry suits me perfectly for my riding style... I like to ride and descend fast, and it is so settled. It also nails the ride vs aero bit remarkably well, given that it has a thick wing-like seatpost. But I must confess I wanted it because of the way it looked, and the perceived benefits of 'aero'.

    Were I to buy another bike, I would look for one that shared a similar wheelbase and trail as the A18.

    Weight... less important to me, within reason. Most half-decent frames will vary by only a couple of hundred grams, and you won't feel it in the frame.
    "If you act like you know what you are doing, you can do anything you want- except neurosurgery"- Sharon Stone

  5. #5
    Senior Member Gasper's Avatar
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    Light weight, Light Weight, Light Weight

    Oh and stiffness, Aero and looks.

    All important IMHO

  6. #6
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    Reflectors and a bell!

    Joking aside, for me it has to look the part and be the type of bike needed i.e; aero, tt, commuter etc.

    I bought my 883 as it looks stunning plus I wanted an aero bike. The only down side to its looks is the raw carbon finish. It looks crap in some lights and angles, but that doesn't, or rather didn't affect the performance.

    It's not the lightest of bikes though, so that may be a factor for my next purchase. I remember being out on a ride with a mate who is an incredible climber. He is right up there for amateur cyclists and in the top 200 for Caerphilly Mountain. Anyway, he stopped for a piss and I held is bike and couldn't believe how light it was. Perhaps something like that would knock a few seconds off my climb times?

    A bike with air bags is probably the top of the list at the moment though!

  7. #7
    Senior Member portia's Avatar
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    Thank you all. I like the idea of building a bike. Perhaps next year I'll give it a go.

  8. #8
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    There is a place you can go and learn how to weld your own steel frame- now that would be satisfying!
    "If you act like you know what you are doing, you can do anything you want- except neurosurgery"- Sharon Stone

  9. #9
    Senior Member portia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PRSboy View Post
    There is a place you can go and learn how to weld your own steel frame- now that would be satisfying!
    If I were to design and put together my own frame, it would be made of human tears and look like that:

    ff824b33493b77e95bf6f47a12e1029d.jpg

  10. #10
    Senior Member coolboarder's Avatar
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    Depends on what you want the frame for. For winter and touring I want a fairly relaxed compliant frame that will be comfortable over long distances, weight is not so important so I chose steel and a 56 cm frame. Home maintenance is important so I have external routing. For faster summer rides I want a stiff, lightweight but still quite compliant frame with shorter angles that won't beat me up. I'm not bothered too much about aero but I do want a nod towards it so long as it doesn't compromise the weight - I don't ride very fast and most of my riding is in the hills. Carbon was the obvious material and the Cannondale Supersix Evo HC 54 cm was the perfect choice for me: it was the lightest mainstream frame available 2 years ago at 760 gm (5.9 kg all up), there are still few lighter but the truncated aerofoil tubes gave some aero advantage and it rode better than any other bike I tested at the time: Stork, Cippolini, Bianchi, Colnago and Look (didn't try Trek but never really liked them for some reason - maybe to do with His Lanceness)! The gear cables were externally routed (only the rear brake is internal) but as I changed to eTap that made no difference.

    And of course its got to look right - beauty is in the eye of the beholder.
    It doesn't matter how many times you fall down, its how times many you get back up that count.

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