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  1. #1
    Senior Member ibbo68's Avatar
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    Castelli Perfetto LS

    Does anyone own a Castelli Perfetto long sleeve?
    Any good?
    Pros?
    Cons?
    Cyclesurgery have them in a rather nice Grey for £140.Thinking of putting it my Xmas list.(Which basically means telling the missus to buy it me for Xmas)


    https://www.cyclesurgery.com/p/caste...SABEgLGlfD_BwE

  2. #2
    Senior Member The return of Marty Wild's Avatar
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    CB possibly?
    "Iím glad you asked me twice, you see I am a bilingual, Iím a bilingual illiterateÖ I canít read in two languages."

  3. #3
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    Is this the successor to the Gabba?

    If so the best cycling garment I have ever bought. Good fit, I don't ride sub-zero and its plenty warm enough for that, and it washes really well - I've had it 4 or 5 years and it will get washed once a week throughout the winter - it hasn't stretched or sagged at all and no signs of wear. I reckon I've still got a good few years use left.

  4. #4
    Senior Member coolboarder's Avatar
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    Marty is correct and yes it is the Gabba in all but name. It is perfect for late autumn weather, the Windstopper does a great job keeping out the morning chill and the side vents prevent you overheating when it warms up a bit. Bear in mind I'm cold blooded so below 10C I'd want a long and short sleeved base layer underneath and below 5C I'd revert to an insulated jacket. But don't expect it to be waterproof. It will hold off persistent drizzle and a light shower but will soak through in heavy rain. I've found the rear pockets are a bit small and fiddly and given it is designed to be worn in wet weather (the pockets have drain holes in them) it could do with a waterproof pocket for a phone. The long tail would do a good job in protecting your ass from spray but as I would be riding with mudguards in wet weather it doesn't do much for me. Its place in the wardrobe is for cold but not freezing changeable days and it means you don't have to reach for a rain jacket as soon as it starts to rain - you can happily ride for a while before deciding if its going to stop or get heavier and call for a waterproof.

    The medium is a good fit on my near 6ft, 64 kg frame - no flapping without being overly tight. The collar zips up quite high so keeps the neck warm. Mine is in a smart bright red to match my ensemble. I tend to view it as a jacket rather than a jersey so, especially as I will likely be wearing a base layer, don't wash it too often so as not to compromise the DWR coating.

    Incidentally I have the sort sleeved version for cool, changeable summer days and is great with some DWR arm warmers.
    Last edited by coolboarder; 8th December 2018 at 10:47 AM.
    It doesn't matter how many times you fall down, its how times many you get back up that count.

  5. #5
    Senior Member The return of Marty Wild's Avatar
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    What is your DWR washing technique?
    "Iím glad you asked me twice, you see I am a bilingual, Iím a bilingual illiterateÖ I canít read in two languages."

  6. #6
    Senior Member ibbo68's Avatar
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    Cheers DM & CB.I thought it was a Gabba.Friends have also confirmed what you've said.I had a jacket in my old CC livery a couple of years ago that claimed to be made from the same material in the same factory as the Gabba and I liked that so if I've told the missus to go for it.
    Quote Originally Posted by The return of Marty Wild View Post
    What is your DWR washing technique?
    Same as with my walking gear.
    Put washing machine on a hot cycle empty to get rid of all detergent(it kills the DWR) then wash in pure soap flakes or Nikwax/Grangers.(Pure soap-flakes are much cheaper than dedicated washing products,I still have a box that cost £1 about 10 years ago!).I then either iron or tumble dry depending on instructions(heat rejuvenates the DWR).If a garment states iron then don't tumble dry and vice-versa!
    Every year or so I'll use a re-proofer,again Nikwax or Grangers but unless really filthy(like an MTB jacket) just washing and heat usually works.
    My Berghaus Mera Peak walking coat is now 15 years old and still works like new
    Last edited by ibbo68; 8th December 2018 at 3:15 PM.

  7. #7
    Senior Member coolboarder's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The return of Marty Wild View Post
    What is your DWR washing technique?
    30 degree wool wash but with normal washing detergent, just make sure there is no fabric conditioner.

    Now having read ibbo's post I wonder if I should use soap flakes/Grangers. I didn't think detergent would affect he DWR coating, I am a lot more careful with Gortex ski wear and only use Grangers for that.
    It doesn't matter how many times you fall down, its how times many you get back up that count.

  8. #8
    Senior Member ibbo68's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by coolboarder View Post
    Now having read ibbo's post I wonder if I should use soap flakes/Grangers. I didn't think detergent would affect he DWR coating, I am a lot more careful with Gortex ski wear and only use Grangers for that.
    There was an article regarding this in Trail Magazine some years ago.Unless fabrics/DWR have changed that much I believe it still applies.You can use Non-Bio detergents but they require more rinses as they leave a residue that hinders the DWR and you will have to reproof every time.
    I was given the natural soapflakes tip by one of the "tech advisors" in George Fisher Outdoors,Keswick.It basically does the same job a Nikwax/Grangers Tech-wash at a fraction of the cost and you'll probably get away with 5 or 6 washes before a reproof is needed.

  9. #9
    Senior Member The return of Marty Wild's Avatar
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    Interesting stuff. I’ve run the machine to remove residues but only dhdca cool quick wash. I then remove the detergent drawer. Then I crack in with Nikeax wash on a cool run.

    Not sure my Sportful clobber mentions iron it tumble though, need to check it out.
    "Iím glad you asked me twice, you see I am a bilingual, Iím a bilingual illiterateÖ I canít read in two languages."

  10. #10
    Senior Member coolboarder's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ibbo68 View Post
    You can use Non-Bio detergents but they require more rinses as they leave a residue that hinders the DWR and you will have to reproof every time.
    I was given the natural soapflakes tip by one of the "tech advisors" in George Fisher Outdoors,Keswick.It basically does the same job a Nikwax/Grangers Tech-wash at a fraction of the cost and you'll probably get away with 5 or 6 washes before a reproof is needed.
    I've been to Castelli's care instructions on-line and they say you can happily use non-bio detergent (bio detergent can contain bleach) with DWR and Windstopper and the garments will take 30-40 cycles before needing re-proofing - just make sure there is no fabric conditioner. It also suggested it is better to spray with a Nikwax re-proofer rather than wash the whole garment in it especially of there is a fleecy lining as otherwise it could reduce the wicking the insulation and wicking effect.

    I have to say none of my DWR coated garments have ever been remotely water-proof even when new, especially knee and arm warmers and tights, they will resist fine drizzle at best but as soon as there are proper rain drops they soon soak through.
    It doesn't matter how many times you fall down, its how times many you get back up that count.

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